Archive for ‘Twitter’

October 13, 2012

Talknowledgy Episode #102: Sony sues their own spokesman, Facebook launches ‘real’ gifts, Apple stock drops, and more

This week we check in with the American Vice Presidential Debate and the “Mansplaining Paul Ryan” meme that popped up hours before the event.

We also stay up-to-date on the smartphone wars, including the announcement that the Galaxy SIII beat out the iPhone 4S at London Awards Show for “Phone of the Year” honours, and how the recent iPhone 5 problems have affected their stock price.

We discuss the new Facebook Gifts Beta launch where you can buy and send ‘real’ gifts to your friends in our “Creepy or Awesome?!” segment.

Our YouTube Hero this week is a video of the Ohio State University Marching Band’s halftime show, which was a great tribute to video games. It was posted less than a week ago and already has over 8 million views.

Our #Fail of the week is Sony, for suing their own ad spokesman. We had a slight tech issue with Seg 4 but Phil was able to recap the major points.

If you liked the show, feel free to subscribe to this blog or our RSS feed to make sure you’re always up-to-date with Talknowledgy.

October 6, 2012

Talknowledgy Episode #101: The Denver Debate, promoted facebook statuses, another iPhone 5 issue, and more!

In this episode we look at how the world of social media reacted to the first Presidential Debate of 2012 as Barack Obama and Mitt Romney squared off in Denver. Check out this infographic for a Twitter timeline of the whole event.

In our “Creepy of Awesome!?” segment, we completely focus on Facebook. Would you pay $7 to increase the chances of your friends see your status? What do you think about Facebook partnering with DataLogix to associate your Facebook account to an unrelated email address you have given to your favourite retailer?

This week’s YouTube Hero is College Humour for its “Romney Style” video – a parody of Gangnam Style.

And in our “Hashtag Fail of the Week” segment we look at a Kickstarter project (a book about Kickstarter) that failed to get funded through the service itself. *insert joke about irony here*

If you liked the show, feel free to subscribe to this blog or our RSS feed to make sure you’re always up-to-date with Talknowledgy.

September 12, 2012

My 5 favourite fake Twitter accounts [screenshots]

I often try to take a business or educational approach to my posts on http://www.davidhallsocialmedia.com as a way to bring value to readers. But this week, I thought I’d have a bit of fun. When my Talknowledgy (podcast) co-host @PhilGaudreau linked me to a parody Twitter account poking fun at Statistics Canada (Canada’s national statistical agency), I just couldn’t resist trying to find other great fake twitter accounts.

In my books, a good fake Twitter account makes it clear that they are a joke. Sometimes this is done in the username, sometimes in the bio, sometimes in the icon, and all the time in the content of the tweets. It also can’t be too crude or offensive. Granted, some of the accounts below have tweets that made me cringe; for the most part, though, they are pretty harmless. Good fake Twitter accounts should also be consistent in both frequency of post and theme. For example, the @Queen_UK is often tweeting about drinking gin and using the hashtag #GinOclock. The Mitt Romney may tweet a bit much, but it’s often focused on his enormous wealth.

Here are a few favourites:

Statistics Canada – @STATS_CANADA

I love this account because it is full of Canadiana. References to the cold weather, KidStreet, locations, hockey, music, coin currency, and more. It’s also the most consistently tasteful account in this list. With only 440 tweets so far, I’m looking forward to seeing more.

Mitt Romney – @MlTTR0MNEY – Note: The “I” in “MITT” is actually the number “1”

A great satirical look at the Republican Presidential challenger. Mainly poking fun at his wealth and disconnect with the average American, it sometimes also covers republican policies, religion,  current events, etc. This account retweets a lot, which kind of waters-down the content, but it still ranks top 5 for me.

Queen of England – Elizabeth Windsor – @Queen_UK

Lots of people love the Queen, especially in the commonwealth countries. She is often characterized as a teetotaling granny, but this account paints a different portrait. She’s a gin-swilling sarcastic lady who likes to make fun of world figures, including her scandalous grandson, Prince Harry.

John Madden – @fauxjohnmadden 

If you are a football fan, you have suffered through hundreds, if not thousands of Madden-isms over the years. One of my personal favourites was from a Monday Night Football game a few seasons back where he said “A first down is important not just because it’s a first down, it’s a whole new set of downs.” (*facepalm) It’s clear that he doesn’t need a Twitter account to make up silly things to say–he’s full of them! This account is great because it is up-to-date with what’s going on in the world of football, right down to plays in individual games.

Kim Jong-Un – @KimJongUn

I’m not really sure what to think about this one. I like it when the account makes fun of us in western democracies, but poking fun at the turmoil the people go through in North Korea is a bit much.

If you liked these accounts, be sure to Google “best fake twitter accounts” and you’ll find dozens of other blogs claiming to have the 5-best10-best, even 50-best Twitter parody accounts that “you MUST follow”.

What are your favourite parody Twitter accounts? Leave a comment, let us know!

August 29, 2012

A look at the new Klout score and features [Screenshots]

New Klout scores and features have rolled out through the month of August, and I think its a step in the right direction. From the beginning of Klout, there have been people who have rightly questioned the importance, relevance, and accuracy of measuring social influence with an algorithm. Instead of getting defensive of their product, Klout focused on improvement. A few updates have been released over the years, but the one from August 2012 seems to be the most promising. Essentially, there are three elements to the latest update:

Discover – A rudimentary beginning to a Klout/social media dashboard. You get an idea of what per cent each social network contributes to your Klout score. For me, I’m about 80% Twitter dominant, and I’d say that’s pretty accurate. Beyond that, there’s not a whole lot of new stuff here. They continue to display your 7-day, 30-day, and 90-day Klout score movement, number of mentions, likes, followers, friends, +1’s, connections, etc. All this is interesting, but not overly helpful.

Moments – This is a list of all the interactions your accounts have had over the last 90 days. It includes likes, mentions, followers gained, RT, +1 in Klout, and so on. You can scroll back for three months to see what pieces of content were most engaging to your audience. On each “moment” there’s a curious little meter that consists of five green balls. The more engaging your content is, the more balls will be turned green. It’s a decent, chronological overview, but I’d like the ability to sort by highest and lowest ranked pieces of content, rather than having to scroll through and look at them all.

New Klout score – This is probably the most important part of the August 2012 update. Now, Klout uses significantly broader data sets and signals, from less than 100 to more than 400, to analyze  and calculate your online influence. They have also increased the number of data points analyzed on a daily basis from 1 billion to 12 billion in an attempt to deliver a more accurate and up-to-date score for Klout users. They now include many more actions from Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and more, and for the first time they incorporate Wikipedia. Klout even published the key things they measure for each network. Here are the highlights (pulled verbatim from this post).

  • Facebook:
    • Mentions: A mention of your name in a post indicates an effort to engage with you directly.
    • Likes: The simplest action that shows engagement with the content you create.
    • Comments: As a reaction to content you share, comments also reflect direct engagement by your network.
    • Subscribers: Subscriber count is a more persistent measure of influence that grows over time.
    • Wall Posts: Posts to your wall indicate both influence and engagement.
    • Friends: Friend count measures the reach of your network, but it is less important than how your network engages with your content.
  • Twitter
    • Retweets: Retweets increase your influence by exposing your content to extended follower networks.
    • Mentions: People seeking your attention by mentioning you is a strong signal of influence. We also take into account the differences in types of mentions, including “via” and “cc”.
    • List Memberships: Being included on lists curated by other users demonstrates your areas of influence.
    • Followers: Follower count is one factor in your Score, but we heavily favor engagement over size of audience.
    • Replies: Replies show that you are consistently engaging your network with quality content.
  • Google+
    • Comments: As a reaction to content you share, comments also reflect direct engagement by your network.
    • +1’s: The simplest action that shows engagement with the content you create.
    • Reshares: Reshares increase your influence by exposing your content to extended networks on Google+.
  • LinkedIn
    • Title: Your reported title on LinkedIn is a signal of your real-world influence and is persistent.
    • Connections: Your connection graph helps validate your real-world influence.
    • Recommenders: The recommenders in your network add additional signals to the contribution LinkedIn makes to your Score.
    • Comments: As a reaction to content you share, comments also reflect direct engagement by your network.
  • foursquare
    • Tips Done: The number of suggestions you’ve left that have been completed indicate your ability to influence others on foursquare.
  • Klout
    • +K received: Receiving +K increases your Klout Score by an amount that is capped in every 90-day measurement cycle to protect the integrity of the Score.
  • Wikipedia
    • Page Importance: Measured by applying a PageRank algorithm against the Wikipedia page graph.
    • Inlinks to Outlinks Ratio: Compares the number of inbound links to a page to the number of outbound links.
    • Number of Inlinks: Measures the total number of inbound links to a page.

For more reading about this update, and other Klout projects, check out their blog :

What do you think of the new Klout score and feature roll-out? If your account hasn’t been upgraded, login to preview.klout.com and take a look around.

June 6, 2012

Are your tweets worth reading?…Probably not [Infographic]

For years now, my Twitter rule-of-thumb has been to always keep my audience in mind when I tweet. I often ask the question “how is this of value to my followers, or to the individuals I’m interacting with?” If I can see value, I send it; if it’s a bit weak, I think twice. Sure I’ve sent out some garbage tweets over the years, but for the most part I think I’ve been pretty consistent.

Essentially I’m trying to share content that is worth consuming and sharing, but I’ve never really stopped to think what percentage of my tweets are “worth reading” according to my readers. A recent study that appeared in the Harvard Business Review suggests that only 36% of the average users’ tweets were actually “worth reading”, leaving the remaining 64% to be either “just OK” or “Not worth reading” at all.

This study asked 1,400+ users to rank 40,000+ different tweets, and they were able to compile a list of the best and worst “types” of tweets. There were a couple surprises in there. First, “random thought” and “self-promotion” tweets were most popular. I would have thought that these would have been considered useless or too self-interested, but it turns out that the “random thoughts” are often good for a laugh, and self-promotional tweets are welcome when they link to useful resources and information.

Another surprise is that “conversation” tweets ranked as one of the worst types of tweets. It appears that most Twitter users don’t appreciate public conversations between a few people.  Personally, I like these tweets. I love having open conversations on Twitter. I will use a RT to provide the context of the conversation and add my additional thoughts as well.  I often find that others who were not in the original conversation will chime in to further the discussion and offer new points-of-view.

Now for the infographic:

What percentage of your tweets do you think are “worth reading”?

April 4, 2012

The Social Media Clubhouse: MLB’s new social media policy in action

The 2012 Major League Baseball (MLB) season is just under way, and a growing number of the ballpark faithful are connecting with their home team like never before. Whether you root for the Brew Crew, the Buccos, the BoSox, or the Bronx Bombers, all of the 30 MLB teams are now curating content in their own “Social Media Clubhouses”.

MLB’s open approach to social media is guided by their recently released social media policy. Distributed to all of the leagues players about 2 weeks before the 2012 season kicked off, it contains a memo explaining the intent of the policy, then the policy itself. The memo encourages players to use social media to “help bring fans closer to the game and have them engaged with baseball, your club and you in a meaningful way”. Then the policy itself contains a list of prohibited conduct. It’s pretty basic stuff for any employer to expect from their employees, such as don’t harass people, don’t make insensitive jokes, don’t share sexually explicit content, don’t make discriminatory or derogatory statements, etc. The policy is simple, short, and straightforward – well done MLB!

The pace of a baseball game lends itself nicely to social media use and to Twitter in particular. I can watch a pitch, send a tweet, read a few others, be ready for the next pitch and not miss a thing. Watching the game while following a variety of MLB-related hashtags and accounts is a great option. You can converse with other fans, get some behind-the-scenes looks at your team, and view great pics from people who are actually at the ballpark.

But the Social Media Clubhouse is more than just Twitter. In essence, it’s a social media dashboard where you can:

  • Read the latest blog posts
  • Participate in various discussion forums
  • Check out fan photos
  • Download a browser toolbar
  • Subscribe to their newsletter
  • Follow their Google+ stream
  • Like their Facebook page
  • View and follow their Twitter feed
  • And my favourite – A list of all player accounts active on Twitter so you can tweet with the players directly. It’s a new level of access to the players that was impossible before – and they actually respond.

As a life-long Toronto Blue Jays fan, I started noticing social media creeping into the MLB experience a few years ago when the Blue Jays began experimenting with Tweeting Tuesdays. During this promotion, fans would ask questions of the announcers, respond to trivia questions, and win prizes. At that point the club was planning on having only about 6 Tweeting Tuesdays, but by the end of 2011 it was every week.

Fast forward to today and all of the teams are running a Social Media Clubhouse – and it looks something like this:

If you are a social media enthusiast and a baseball fan, these clubhouses are a must. Now all you have to do is find your favourite team and follow the game!

AL East

AL Central

AL West

 

NL East

NL Central

NL West

 

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