Archive for ‘Reader Submissions’

November 17, 2012

Talknowledgy Podcast #107: BB10, Ron Swanson’s Movember video, talking trash with athletes on Twitter, and more

Right off the top of the show we discuss BlackBerry 10, Pinterest brand pages, and Facebook’s rumoured job board.

This week’s “Creepy or Awesome?!” is centred on the recent Twitter outrage when big man Pau Gasol from the NBA Lakers missed the last shot of the game handing the historic club yet another early season loss.

Our YouTube Hero this week is Ron Swanson’s pro-Movember video encouraging men to keep growing their “mos” and raise money for men’s health. It also has some guest appearances from cast members from “The Office”.

Finally, a military sex scandal gets our #Hashtag Fail of the Week. That’s right, the sloppy use of email clients may have lead to the infidelity bust in the David Petraeus scandal.

If you liked the show, feel free to subscribe to this blog or our RSS feed to make sure you’re always up-to-date with Talknowledgy.

September 28, 2012

Students, young professionals, and social media in the workplace [Infographic]

I work with college students everyday, and we often chat about making the transition from College to career. This includes conversations around finding their first professional job, expectations they have of the employer, and how to manage personal and professional lives. A lot of them talk about wanting to enjoy the work that they do, work for a company they believe in, have the freedom to work from home, and belong to a collaborative team environment where guidance is nearby, but not overbearing.

When we get to discussing the intersection of their social media accounts and their professional careers, they often see it as their “right” to use their own social media accounts at work. The attitude seems to be “if the job gets done, what’s the big deal if I spend 15 minutes on Facebook while having my 10:30 a.m. coffee?” And I would have to agree. If the job gets done, I have no problem with office Facebooking. It’s also quite interesting that when I ask these same students if they would be OK doing some work at  home if they couldn’t get it done in the 9-5 office hours they are paid to be there, they say they would…without hesitation.

The infographic below from OnlineCollegeCourses.com shares some findings that seem to support the anecdotal evidence I’ve seen in the attitudes of college students as they transform into young professionals.

A few statistics jumped out at me:

  • Almost 30% of college students said they value social media freedom and device flexibility over salary
  • 67% of young professionals believe their company’s IT policy needs updating
  • Nearly 70% of the same young professionals believe it is OK to use a company-issued device for both professional and personal matters

Big thanks to davidhallsocialmedia.com reader Muhammad Saleem (@msaleem) for sending me this infographic.
Social Media vs. Salary
Brought to you by: OnlineCollegeCourses.com

May 17, 2012

A look at the Facebook IPO [Infographic]

Plenty of information and predictions are out there about the looming Facebook IPO. I don’t think I can add a whole lot to the analysis, so I won’t even try.

My expertise also doesn’t lie in telling you what companies to invest in, so I won’t do that either.

What I want to share are the things that I’ll be watching for as this IPO unfolds:

I am probably most interested in two main elements. First, the spectacle of IPO day – anticipated to be Friday, May 18, 2012: the speculation beforehand, the fury of transactions during the day, and the resulting positive and negative media coverage. For some reason, I love this carnival atmosphere. Tied closely to this,  I’m eager to watch how Facebook “messages” this major event. My background in communications and public relations always has me  looking for the PR side of the equation and to learn from the  good (or bad) lessons from a communications perspective. It will be interesting to see how they frame this transaction, see if they were  successful in communicating their main message.

Second, I’m interested in actually seeing how the stock performs. What will be the price of a share after week one, six months, and one year after the IPO? If you recall, both Groupon and Zyngna tanked after their IPO. LinkedIn, however, did much better. Here’s how those big three social media IPOs of 2011 have performed since their big day:

  • Groupon opened at $26.11 a share (Nov. 4, 2011), as of the morning of May 17, 2012, it was down a whopping 50% to $13.05
  • Zygna opened at $9.50 a share (Dec. 16, 2011), as of May 17, 2012, it was down about 13% to $8.22
  • LinkedIn opened at $94.25 a share (May 19, 2011) as of May 17, 2012, it was up 17% to $113.49

If you’re watching this one too, the infographic below provides some interesting statistics and a decent context to help us understand the events of May 18. Big thanks to davidhallsocialmedia.com reader @gvoakes for drawing my attention to this infographic.

Facebook MBA: Behind the IPO Everyone's Talking About
Created by: MBAOnline.com

March 13, 2012

We are impatient and rude…and Google is to blame! [Infographic]

The infographic below (originally shared with me by @gvoakes) paints a picture of a speed-obsessed, impatient, and rude population… and I don’t think it’s far off. With astonishing numbers like:

  • Google answers 34,000 questions every second (3 billion daily Google searches)
  • 25% of people abandon web pages that take more than 4 seconds to load
  • 50% of mobile users abandon a page if it doesn’t load in under 10 seconds, and 60% of those users would never return to that site
  • 40% of mobile shoppers will abandon an eCommerce site if it doesn’t load in 3 seconds

It clearly shows that we just can’t wait to get that online content. Perhaps this is because we know that we can get what we are looking for elsewhere online. If I want to buy a new Android phone online, I have virtually unlimited options – if Virgin Wireless isn’t loading quickly enough, I’ll hop over to Comcast, or Rogers, or Bell, or Cellular One. And if I’m looking for the latest news headlines, well there really is no end to where I can find this information.

But what I find the most interesting about this infographic is how this “instantly connected” feeling has changed our offline consumer behaviour. Perhaps this is because the last section of the infographic reflects elements of my own behaviour.

  • 15 minutes is the MAXIMUM time I will wait for a service
  • I have boycotted several shops and restaurants for inattentive or slow customer service
  • And I hate to say it, but I’m sure I have been rude to folks who are serving me too slow. I try to be as understanding as possible, but what’s taking so long?

What do you think? Are you one of those rude, impatient, speed-obsessed members of the “Google Generation”? Or are you happy to wait 45+ minutes to eat at Red Lobster because somethings are worth the wait?


Created by: Online Graduate Programs

January 17, 2012

Give me wi-fi or I ain’t coming: 60% of college students demand free wi-fi from their schools [Infographic]

With a freshly-minted semester just underway at thousands of post-secondary institutions around the world, www.onlinecolleges.net takes a look at technology usage and the expectations of students walking the hallways of higher-learning this year.  There’s a lot of information in the infographic below, so grab a coffee and settle in for a few minutes. Here are a few things that caught my eye:

Wi-fi internet access is critically important. And so it should be…Here are the numbers:

  • 90% of students feel that wi-fi is as essential to an education as a classroom or a computer
  • 75% of college students say that wi-fi access on college campus helps them get better grades
  • 60% of students would NOT attend an institution unless it had free wi-fi.

The availability of free wi-fi is more often becoming the expectation, not the exception.  I’m always on the prowl for free wi-fi, whether it’s college or university campuses, private businesses who offer a free guest connection, coffee shops, pubs, etc. I consider if a restaurant has free wi-fi when I’m contemplating places to dine. I’ve even emailed to ask about wi-fi so I can blog, watch the game, and perhaps enjoy some hot wings.

In the not-so-distant future, we will see more emphasis on college campus wi-fi performance speeds and up-time. Nothing frustrates me more than when I get an email advising of an “unplanned outage on campus”. Unplanned outages are major inconveniences for college students and faculty, and these outages are a cost of billions of dollars in lost revenue in the private sector, so it should be taken seriously.

Google and Wikipedia are essential sites. 47% of students named Google or Wikipedia as their “one site they can’t do without.” That makes sense. What I find more interesting is that only 8% of students listed Blackboard as their top site. Blackboard is a learning management system that allows professors and students to connect online.  The challenge with Blackboard is that it is only as good as the professor can make it. Sure, a few can really make the tool shine, but I would wager that most students would describe their blackboard experience as a place to view grades and look at old PowerPoints posted by the professor.

Most students don’t want to connect with their professors on social media, but it’s a close split three ways. 39% of students felt that it was not appropriate to friend their instructor, 31% thought it was OK, and 30% didn’t seem to care either way. I imagine that students are choosing to mitigate the risk of sharing their online image with their professor rather than displaying a genuine disinterest in their professor’s content. Perhaps a subscription would work better  in this case.  In the next study, I would be  interested to know how many professors want to connect with their students via social media. That figure may be even more telling.

Technology Use on the College campus
Via: Online Colleges Guide

December 14, 2011

Implications of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) explained [Infographic]

I LOVE the internet. If you’re a regular www.davidhallsocialmedia.com reader, chances are you love it too. I’ve loved it since I first logged on in the mid-1990s on a borrowed machine (with a 14.4 kbps modem) set up in the dining room of my childhood home. It gave us access to new things like emails, discussion boards, and ICQ. But it also gave us free and easy access to copyrighted material like never before. We could now download warez, appz, images, wavs, mp3s, video clips, etc., for FREE! This availability of content has allowed us to explore different genres of music, artists, types of film, new ideas, make new connections, and meet new people that would have been out of our reach before the internet.

Much of this discovery was done with a disregard for copyright, but not because we wanted to break the law. It was done in the interest of sharing. Sharing things we loved, sharing things we found pleasure in, sharing with strangers.  Sharing is critical to the very DNA of the internet .

But the entertainment industry in the US doesn’t like this perceived “sharing” threat. Enter the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) – A Bill that will allow the United States Government to block citizens from viewing websites – The infographic below provides a good summary of the background and arguments for and against the Bill. Big thanks to Muhammad Saleem, social media blogger extraordinaire, for sharing this infographic with me courtesy of Business Insurance Quotes. .

To me, SOPA has got it all wrong. In the past, if we purchased a record, tape, or CD, we were free to lend it to a friend. If we shared similar tastes in movies, we could arrange a DVD swap, right? But if I buy a song on iTunes, I can’t share a copy with my friends. Huh? The flow of information on the internet doesn’t mesh with the archaic revenue model for the large entertainment industry, but instead of updating the model, a government-run censorship of the internet is what we may be faced with.

Perhaps comedian Louis C.K. has the right idea. He recently hired his own TV crew to capture his latest stand-up routine. He then sold it on the internet, himself, for $5 a piece. Users who downloaded were free to use the video how they liked. They could share it with friends, post on their website, make DVDs, etc. Louis went broke right? Nope, he claims that he made $200,000 in just 4 days. More on this story at Mashable.

Should we protect IP at all costs or empower open collaboration? What do you think about SOPA?

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