Archive for ‘LinkedIn’

January 21, 2015

Facebook cover size, and 26 other exact images size requirements for your social media profiles [Infographic]

I’m always checking, rechecking, and double checking the proper size constraints for images uploaded to my social media accounts. Nobody wants to upload a profile picture, which they rather like, and have the parameters of the website stretch and skew it to make it fit the one-size-fits-some model. I have found that the best way to avoid the potential problem of stretching and skewing is to crop (or design) the images you plan on using on your social media accounts to the exact pixel sizes according to the rules of the site…but that information isn’t always easy to find.

If you do plan on uploading exact-sized images to your Facebook account, the good news is that you don’t need to be a Photoshop expert to create these perfect pics. Sure, Photoshop will work just fine, but you can crop your images to exact sizes using almost any photo editing software, including the ones that come bundled in Windows (Microsoft Image Manager), or OS X (iPhoto). If you want to use software with a few more features than these standard options, but don’t want to pay a dime, you can try one of these 10 free photo editing tools. I’ve used GIMP in the past and it works well.

Below is a handy infographic from the people at setupablogtoday.com who have collected all the pixel requirements for some of the most popular social networks all in one place. Knowing these exact sizes will help you create and/or crop perfectly-sized profile pictures, cover images, headers, backgrounds, banners, and thumbnails.

2015-social-media-image-sizes-infographic

March 5, 2014

LinkedIn announces a “virtually useless” member blocking feature

linkedinblockedFirst of all I love LinkedIn. It is THE place to host your professional image for the world to see. It is, without a doubt, the top online resume platform. I also love that their revenue stream is more than just selling a glut of ads and promoted trends.

Now with all the niceties out of the way, here’s why I think their new blocking feature is virtually useless.

1. People can still view your profile using the “Anonymous Viewing” feature. For example, if you decide to block me, I can just sign up with a different email, enable the “anonymous viewing” feature and start creeping. Granted, I won’t be able to get ALL of the information you have on your LinkedIn profile, but it would be a good start if I had nefarious intentions.

2. It won’t prevent those who you block from getting the information they are after. Let’s say you’ve blocked your old boss, for whatever reason, and she wants to find out where you now work. She can do any of these three things and find the information she is looking for in less than a minute.

  • Go to LinkedIn, without logging in, and view your profile page. Or she can use the “Anonymous Viewing” feature.
  • Ask another LinkedIn user (perhaps from the same company you used to work for) to login with their profile and do some creeping
  • Or just Google your name

3. Why would you want to block anyone from seeing your LinkedIn profile in the first place? LinkedIn is a public exhibition of who you are from a professional perspective and it is just crawling with recruiters looking for their next hire. I use social media with this rule in mind – If I don’t want people knowing something about me, I don’t publish it on the internet. There is always a chance that your information, regardless of your privacy settings or who you block, friend, or follow, can be accessed by anyone with an internet connection.

Blocking users you already know may be of benefit to some, but I think more LinkedIn users would be happy if the ability to view  profiles anonymously was removed. If you are not convinced that LinkedIn blocking is virtually useless, and want to try it out for yourself, here’s a step-by-step guide to blocking and unblocking on LinkedIn…and be sure to let us know what you think of it, I’d love to hear your thoughts on the issue in the comments below.

November 3, 2012

Talknowledgy Podcast #105: Hurricane Sandy, Movember, Uncle Drew, Star Wars goes Disney, social gaming, and more

Plenty to chat about in the world of news this week. We kick off the show by discussing the social media and tech implications of  Hurricane Sandy, the most popular Halloween candy on social media, and the launch of Movember.

In our “Creepy of Awesome?!” section we look at a new Facebook rumor – Users may be able to place classified ads to display to their friends on the social media giant. The main difference between this new feature, and the existing marketplace function, is you now have to pay to have your ad seen.

Our “YouTube Hero” this week is Cleveland Cavaliers guard Kyrie Irving. He reprises his role as Uncle Drew in a Pepsi Max commercial posted to YouTube this past Tuesday. The first video he did, posted May 2012, received 16 million views. Adding to the interest, Irving himself, wrote and directed both commercials.

Uncle Drew: Episode 2

And we couldn’t go a full show without touching on the US Presidential Election, so here’s our Bonus YouTube Hero this week, courtesy of The Simpsons:

Our “Hashtag Fail of the Week” is near and dear to Phil’s heart. Disney announces a new Star Wars trilogy. What do you think super-nerd Phil has to say about that? Tune in to find out!

If you liked the show, feel free to subscribe to this blog or our RSS feed to make sure you’re always up-to-date with Talknowledgy.

October 17, 2012

Not sure I endorse LinkedIn’s new “endorsements” feature

Over the past few weeks, you’ve probably noticed a few emails about people “endorsing” you on LinkedIn.  I got a few of them too, so I thought I’d check it out. I logged into my account and viewed who has endorsed me, and started endorsing people.

LinkedIn’s blog announcement says “We are introducing Endorsements, a new feature that makes it easier to recognize them for their skills and expertise. With just one click, you can now endorse your connections for a skill they’ve listed on their profile or recommend one they haven’t added yet. Think your connection is great at programming AND project management? Let them know!”

And with this, LinkedIn is trying to join the game of online influence. Essentially, they’ve created their own version of Klout, or PeerIndex, or Kred.  Just take a quick look at the profiles on these services below…

…LinkedIn “endorsements”…

 

…kind of looks like…Klout Topics…

…which kind of looks like…the Kred Dashboard…

….which kind of looks like…PeerIndex…

In a world saturated with “topic influence” services, I fear that this isn’t the right move for LinkedIn. Besides competing with an already crowded marketplace, the “endorsements” feature has the potential to harm the LinkedIn experience itself by detracting from the “recommendations” feature. In short, I think people will opt to endorse somebody rather then recommend them, and here’s why that matters: “recommendations” are written explanations about why an employee is valued. They usually refer to specific  experiences, work projects, or professional attributes, and the relationship of the author to the person they are recommending is disclosed. An “endorsement”, on the other hand, is a quick “+1″ on the user’s self-proclaimed skills. One can simply scroll down a user’s profile and click on each of their skills. No explanation, no disclosure of relationship, no details.  This quick “+1″ ability may also leave the door open to “I’ll endorse you if you endorse me back”  behaviour.

Trying to measure online influence isn’t a bad thing. In the past, I must admit, I’ve tried to boost my Klout score. I made sure my content was focused, interacted with others regularly, pushed out a lot of updates, etc. But there have also been times when I just didn’t care about it and I completely ignored my social media accounts. Neither of these actions seemed to have influenced my score much, so I can’t see myself continuing to be active in the “endorsement” game.

The Project Management LinkedIn group has a decent discussion this week about “endorsements”. A few good points were made:

What do you think? Are “endorsements” a welcome way to give kudos to colleagues, or a wasteful exercise in meaningless rewards?

May 17, 2012

A look at the Facebook IPO [Infographic]

Plenty of information and predictions are out there about the looming Facebook IPO. I don’t think I can add a whole lot to the analysis, so I won’t even try.

My expertise also doesn’t lie in telling you what companies to invest in, so I won’t do that either.

What I want to share are the things that I’ll be watching for as this IPO unfolds:

I am probably most interested in two main elements. First, the spectacle of IPO day – anticipated to be Friday, May 18, 2012: the speculation beforehand, the fury of transactions during the day, and the resulting positive and negative media coverage. For some reason, I love this carnival atmosphere. Tied closely to this,  I’m eager to watch how Facebook “messages” this major event. My background in communications and public relations always has me  looking for the PR side of the equation and to learn from the  good (or bad) lessons from a communications perspective. It will be interesting to see how they frame this transaction, see if they were  successful in communicating their main message.

Second, I’m interested in actually seeing how the stock performs. What will be the price of a share after week one, six months, and one year after the IPO? If you recall, both Groupon and Zyngna tanked after their IPO. LinkedIn, however, did much better. Here’s how those big three social media IPOs of 2011 have performed since their big day:

  • Groupon opened at $26.11 a share (Nov. 4, 2011), as of the morning of May 17, 2012, it was down a whopping 50% to $13.05
  • Zygna opened at $9.50 a share (Dec. 16, 2011), as of May 17, 2012, it was down about 13% to $8.22
  • LinkedIn opened at $94.25 a share (May 19, 2011) as of May 17, 2012, it was up 17% to $113.49

If you’re watching this one too, the infographic below provides some interesting statistics and a decent context to help us understand the events of May 18. Big thanks to davidhallsocialmedia.com reader @gvoakes for drawing my attention to this infographic.

Facebook MBA: Behind the IPO Everyone's Talking About
Created by: MBAOnline.com

December 6, 2011

The (sad) state of social media use in small business [Infographic]

Sure, we can all think of great examples of small businesses using social media to connect with customers in new and engaging ways using social media – I’ve blogged about some of them. But earlier this week I came across the infographic below from the good folks at Socialnomics about the feelings some small businesses have when it comes to the social frontier, and a few things jumped out at me:

1. Almost all of the respondents (88%) indicated that social media does or will have an impact on their business. Though small businesses seems to be aware of the impact, the majority (70%) of them will not be making additional investments in social media next year. So they seem to know what’s going on, but are unable, or unwilling, to leverage it.

2. Where’s Foursquare? Of the 63% who reported that they have a social media footprint, only 6% report report using Foursquare. This past year, Foursquare has been reporting booming growth, and they even have the Foursquare Merchant Platform that is designed specifically to help businesses create, track, and manage their customer outreach and rewards programs.

3. Why are you so LinkedIn? This one baffles me. Small businesses report that they use LinkedIn (48%) more than Twitter (37%) and Foursquare (6%) combined. After being baffled for a moment, I began to think through WHY small business are gravitating towards LinkenIn. Perhaps because it is comfortable, it is one of the most “traditional” forms of social media – it’s an online resume surrounded by professional conversations. They may be after some best practices as there are many B2B conversations and information sharing going on the LinkedIn blog and on-page discussion groups. But when you look further down on the infographic, you will notice that businesses report that the top three uses they have for social media are: brand awareness, lead generation, and customer service….not best practices. This could be an example of the actions of business not being in sync with their goals.

There are plenty of other interesting nuggets of information in this infographic, so take a look and feel free to share what really jumps out at you. I’d also be very interested in some more examples of good social media use in small businesses.

Small-Business-Social-Media-Infographic

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